Blast and Giveaway Love is Never Past Tense

Banner small

Love is Never Past Tense 

by Janna Yeshanova

0105ua71596-0238pv[1]Hi Janna, I’m very excited to be the first blog on this blast. There will be seven other blogs posting on your book today and all will have something else to show the readers.

Me? I love food, so what is the best thing I could come up with? Questions about your eating habits of course. 🙂

Sit down and start talking woman! 🙂 Oh, you brought stuffed peppers with you and they’re for me? They look and smell delish! Thank you.

Being an immigrant to the US did you have trouble adjusting to the eating habits in your new country?

No, I was trying to adjust everybody else to my eating habits. 🙂

Do you like to breakfast the American way or are you a more European starter? i.e. scrambled eggs, or cereal and fruit?

I think cereal and fruit is an American way as well. A cup of coffee is the way to go. Is it American?  South American?

Fast food or slow cooker?

Slow cooker. In my kitchen everything should be fresh and cooked from scratch… and organic.

Burger or sausages?

None of the above 😉

Cabbage or corn on the cob?

Both 🙂 mostly cabbage.

Cocktails or Vodka?

Red wine.

Hey! That’s cheating! But nothing beats a good Red. 🙂

Can you describe your favourite meal?

*Janna laughs* Anything with friends and family around my table, gluttoning everything that has been prepared. Lots of compliments on eggplant dishes. 🙂

What is the dish you prepare when you want to be remembered of your days in the USSR?

Stuffed peppers.

peppers5

prepared in the kitchen of Janna Yeshanova

I thought that stuffed peppers were traditionally a part of Balkan cuisine, but this tasty dish has been adopted by food lovers around the world. I checked with Wikipedia and I got an impression that almost all nations are claiming that the dish belongs to their culture particularly.  Now, it’s hard for me to say what country was a parent of this dish.

Stuffed peppers can be made with a variety of ingredients, from beef or cheese to ground turkey or more vegetables. Meat and rice are always in!  You can include the ingredients you like the most.

I would not recommend shredded watermelon or strawberries 🙂

If you want to know how to make stuffed peppers, just follow these steps.

·  9 green, red and yellow bell peppers

·  3 tbsp. olive oil

·  3 cups chopped onion

·  64 oz. tomato juice

·  1 tsp. dill

·  1 tsp. salt

·  1 tsp. pepper

·  2 lbs. lean ground chicken

·  4 cup long-grain wild dark brown rice

·  4 – 5 large carrots

1.     Cut the tops off 8 bell peppers and remove the seeds. Use a narrow sharp knife to do this carefully. Make sure the peppers are washed before you cook them.

2.     Wash and shred carrots.

3.     Heat 3 tbsp. of olive oil in a deep skillet over medium-high heat. It should take about 30 seconds to a minute for the oil to heat up.

4.     Add chopped onions.  Fry them a few minutes, mixing them.

5.     Add all shredded carrots, mix them with onions in the skillet and keep the skillet for another couple of minutes on the stove, continuing to mix the contents.

6.     Add a cup of tomato juice, black ground pepper and salt as you like to the contents.  Mix it again and keep it on the skillet for another couple of minutes.

7.     In a large bowl, put the ground chicken; add rice and prepared vegetables from the skillet.

8.     Mix all ingredients, adding another cup of tomato juice.  Usually, at this moment I add more ground black pepper and/or salt if needed. With a tablespoon stuff the peppers arranging them in a 9 x 13 inch baking pot. The cut side should be facing up.

9.     Add the rest of the tomato juice so that the liquid is ½ inch higher than the level of the peppers.

10.  Bring the pot with stuffed peppers to a boil on the stove. Then, keep it for about an hour on a low heat after it starts boiling.  I like it better when the pot is not covered.

11.   Also, you may cover the pan with foil and put it in a preheated oven to 350ºF (176ºC) instead of boiling it on the stove. In this case, keep it in the oven for an hour and 20 minutes.

12.  Serve the stuffed peppers.  Russians add sour cream on the top. I do not do it anymore.

13.    Be ready to cook another portion, because it’s never enough!

peppers11

Serve the stuffed peppers.  Russians add sour cream on the top. I don’t do this any more.

And is there a dish you have adjusted to suit the American style?

Why would I do this?

I don’t know? To think of the ‘old’ country?

Is there anything you will not eat or drink? Not even if your life depended on it?

I don’t eat red meat. I don’t drink vodka, but if I would need to disinfect myself I’m sure I will. 🙂

Thanks for answering these questions and giving us that great recipe!

Now it’s over to the book, because that’s why the folks are here, right?

LINPT-3D

The events described in the book occur amidst complicated changes in the political and economic system of the former Soviet Union. In this period of great turmoil, for the country and the people, a period of many broken destinies, the book weaves its story within the discord of the country. Fear is growing, an animal fear. There remains only one way, emigration. This is the same thing as evacuation without bombing and without the ability to come back, the author writes. You cannot give a better definition. The rest you need to read. Because of this, the book delivers multifaceted, versatile content in huge volume to the reader’s range of vision. In some special moments, the author makes us breathless, frantic with worry, and hoping to relax if a satisfactory solution of the situation arrives.

Love Is Never Past Tense… was published first in Russia and Ukraine in 2009, and is now available in English. It is a fascinating, adventurous, historical romance based on a true story.

AMAZON US|B&N|KOBO|GOOGLE PLAY

Autographed print copies available at the Love Is Never Past Tense Website

Or win one, or even a $25 Amazon gift certificate by entering the Giveaway

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Blast and Giveaway Love is Never Past Tense

If you like what you just read, please leave a reply.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s