Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud by Scott Stevens

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Scott Stevens has given us his vision on addiction and sobriety.

I’ve taken this quote from an interview the author had with Indie Author Land

“Indie Author Land: Who needs to read this book?
Stevens: Eight percent of the population is alcoholic — some practicing, some in recovery. Beyond those men and women are, on average, 8-10 people directly impacted by the alcoholic’s drinking and/or relapse. The book is targeted toward those around the alcoholic, to give them answers, as well as the alcoholic who wonders what is behind relapse.”

And this is what the author says about the book:

Nine out of ten people who quit drinking relapse at least once. “Every
Silver Lining Has a Cloud” shows why it’s not just once… without
pithy slogans or trademarked solutions. From the author of “What
the Early Worm Gets,” a startling book defi ning Alcoholism, here’s a
book explaining how and why relapse happens, how to hold it at bay
and why every American should care. Sobriety is a state of illness and
its symptoms, left untreated, lead directly to lapse. Addressing the
Symptoms of Sobriety is essential.
Why would any sober Alcoholic return to the misery?
What are the Symptoms of Sobriety and how do Alcoholics and non-Alcoholics guard against them?
What four overlooked stressors trip up recovery?
Can you hit bottom sober?
The narrative dashes along peaks of anger, joy, desperation, relief and
hope interspersed with solid data on the disease and guidance for
avoiding relapse traps.
It’s not enough to just stop drinking.

If you struggle with an addiction, and it doesn’t have to be alcohol, why not read this book and give his advice a try?

It is available on Amazon in Kindle and paperback

 

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4 thoughts on “Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud by Scott Stevens

  1. My late uncle was an alcoholic, sober since before I was born, but the habit ran in his family. He had to live with being sober until he died, never falling off the wagon.

    It meant cutting ties with his family, who denied alcohol was a problem, and tried ways to get booze into him by stealth.

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