FreeStyle Yoga Project Workshop April 12th 2015

APRIL 12TH 2015. MARK YOUR CALENDAR.

MOVEMENT & BACKBENDS
A FREESTYLE YOGA PROJECT WORKSHOP at VOODOO GYM, MACCLESFIELD
with MARK FREETH & ANNA ROBERTSHAW-FREETH

In the first session of this ‘shop, Mark will warm you up and then take you thru a series of locomotive drills that will bring out the best in your strength, stamina, agility & flexibility capabilities. When was the last time you jumped, crawled, spun and rolled in your yoga practice….?

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In the second session, Anna will prep you for backbends – perhaps one of the most challenging postures. After a lengthy warm-up including some innovative techniques, Anna will revisit some standard backbends and introduce you to some funky new material.

L60A2161Dynamic and challenging, The Freestyle Yoga Project is geared towards encouraging students to think for themselves and investigate what’s going on over the side of any particular yogic box. In fact, to also explore what’s going on outside of yoga too

This is intelligent yoga. One size does not fit all.

Equally, EVERYONE is welcome at FYP. ANYONE can do yoga. You don’t have to be fit, strong, flexible – we’ll make you those things. Just give us your time and we’ll help you reach your full potential. And we’d just like to point out that you don’t have to buy into anything to come and train with us – there’s no ideological-philosophical-religious standpoint to what we do. We’re not trying to sell you anything – other than health and well-being.

All are welcome to this workshop – no matter what yogic discipline you come from. Be prepared to work hard. Bring a sense of humour. Leave received wisdom about yoga behind.

This two-part workshop can be booked as one whole day (£65) or each part separate (£35 for just one part, morning or afternoon.)
There will be tea and biscuits, bring your own lunch to munch.

Don’t wait too long as this workshop will fill up fast! To book and pay contact Lucy Alves Yoga via PM on facebook or through mail.

CAM00192Mark & Anna run The Freestyle Yoga Project studio in Tunbridge Wells. They offer daily classes, teacher trainings, and retreats & workshops the world over. www.freestyleyogaproject.com / info@freestyleyogaproject.com

In Memoriam B.K.S. Iyengar

B.K.S. Iyengar 1918-2014

Guruji_nov2012Bellur Krishnamachar Sundaraj Iyengar has passed away at the age of 96.

Much could be said about his contribution to Yoga but I prefer to let you all comment with your remembrances.

I never had the chance to be in a class taught by him but had the opportunity to hear him speak on occasion and I can say that he was a man with a clear vision and inspired me to be the person I am today.

With Iyengar’s passing now there are precious few direct inheritors of T. Krishnamacharya’s lineage still teaching today.

Fortunately, there are literally thousands of yoga teachers who are trained enough to be the next generation tasked with carrying on the vital work of spreading the precious teachings that flow from this deep, rich wellspring.

Please, post your thoughts and what any of the three meant to you or someone you know below in the comments.

 

 

How To Catch Daily Life With a Pen

As things slowly get back to ‘normal’ the goblin returns to this blog too. I’ve found him willing to let me use whatever he writes on my blog and I shall take him up on that one. So here’s to new beginnings and musings by a live writer I know as Fleamailman or The Goblin.

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to the goblin there was only one score that mattered, that of have I caught it with my pen then, in fact, it was just his way of fishing for thoughts, and as if to underline it, the late bistro played good music to a full house of lively chatting drinkers, while one lone figure sat in the corner typing away, looking up and then typing away again before finally posting something to forumland, so simply either the goblin was “there albeit mentally detached from his dailylife” or “here on forumland albeit still attached that dailylife of his”, something he called a shared life, though most people would call it a writer’s distraction then, or worse, simply daydreaming now

 

Middlewich Literary Festival

Saturday morning and it’s grey outside, but I’m all geared up to head out and have a great day. Not because I’m going out on a hike or to a yoga day, but because I’ve been asked to attend the first Middlewich Literary Festival. 🙂

The Middlewich Literary Festival might not be a huge event yet, but to me it means a lot that the organising town council members thought me and my work good enough to be there as an author and do a little song and dance. i.e. talk about writing and my work in particular.

Upon arriving the very first thing I got was a very warm welcome, a cup of tea and cake. Then I was shown to my table (a sign with my name and that I would be signing my work that afternoon on the pure white tablecloth) where I spread out my books and before I knew it the event was well on its way.

Of course I wasn’t the only author there, Catherine Green author of The Redcliffe Pack, and The Darkness of LoveGill Hoffs author of The Sinking of RMS Tayleur (non-fiction), and Bernice Walmsley (non-fiction) author of the Numerical Reasoning Series were there too. They presented their work and gave away a few ‘secrets’ of the trade. And then there were Phillip Latham (author) and Ian Hill-Smith (illustrator) who entertained the crowd with a partial reading of a kids picture book in the making, Barney The Cowboy. p7&80002 copyI say reading, but it was more than just reading of the words. The author would read a part and then ask the audience what they thought the character, or whatever that particular part was about, would look like and the illustrator would draw that which we told him too. Hilarious!

And then there was that delightful young boy and a teen-aged girl who won both won an award for their entry in the short story competition that was held for this event. Both winning stories were read and very much enjoyed by yours truly. I loved seeing this display of talent in young people. To me it proved that reading/books have a future still, even in this age of Xbox and Playstation.

Anyway, I had a great day and I’m sure those who were there with me will agree with me when I tell you to keep your eye open next year for the second edition of the Middlewich Literary Festival.

(Pictures will follow later)

How To Use Language Properly

Video

According to The Rules and common practice language has only one right way to be used. But is that true? Isn’t it proved by time and experience language is fluid, subject to change to suit the occasion it is used?

Listen to what Stephen Fry has to say on the subject. I think you might agree, even if you are an author and like me want to adhere to the rules and regulations of the current language formalities.

So,what do we do? How do we use this beautiful English Language properly? First of all we need to determinate which spelling we care to use. American or British? Both English but there’s not only a whole ocean dividing the two, there’s a kind of language barrier too.

Take for example the word ‘wilful’. According to my American friends this will be a wrong use of language and  the word should be spelled as following, ‘willful’. There are many more of such examples, which I’m not going to give here.

What I will say on the matter is, be aware of the choice you make. Either use US spelling or UK, don’t mix the two. Of course there will be American readers who will trip over your British spelling and might even mention in a review you don’t know how to spell. But as authors we should know that can happen and move on. Maybe write your next novel according to US spelling rules to show you do know how to spell, or mention in the front matter of your book you write according to British spelling rules because you are a Brit. Problem solved. Of course, this works the other way around too.

The next thing you should take into consideration is what you write. The rules for fiction differ from those for poetry, as those for non-fiction differ from a dissertation, and a blog post differs from a letter to your mom. Unless of course you use your blog to keep your mom in the loop on your life. 🙂 But that is a whole different kind of blog than the common writers blog. What I mean is what Stephen Fry so eloquently put in the video, our language should reflect the occasion, like our behaviour and clothes do. That is the basic rule.

But … Yes, I have a but. Shouldn’t there be room for individuality? What about artistic freedom?

Ha! Yes, we are artists and have a certain idea on how our work should be put into words, but those words have to make sense to the reader. Throw away all the rules and do as you please and you will have no readers for the simple reason your readers will not know what you mean.

It is a fine line we must walk. Write in our own voice. Have the characters speak the way we think they should speak and yet keep it within ‘normal’ range. Keep it eligible to the general public.

If I were to write this:

“I crave to smoke my coffee and dance the words before slipping into that warm canal.”

Would you know I mean the character wants to roast his coffee while he is creating a choreography and thinks on making love to his girlfriend after he is done? Misunderstanding and confusion is what happens if we throw away all conventions and just do as we please.

It doesn’t only applies to the words themselves. Grammar, punctuation, plot, dialogue, it all is language and it all has to adhere to at least the basic rules, no matter which style guide you favour.

So how do we use language properly? By choosing a set of rules from a certain style guide and  stick to them. Be consistent in your choice of spelling and take heed of your audience.

I know it’s not an answer to fit the box, but I guess there is no answer, because let’s face it. In a couple of hundred years our language will have evolved again and the rules as they are today will no longer apply. Like those from Shakespeare’s time no longer apply to the language of today. New words emerge and old ones are forgotten.

So write, write well and honour the language as best you can. When you’ve reached the limit of your ability to know the rules, use that editor to get the last wrongs ‘write’.