Seasons Of The Fool by Lynne Cantwell

Season of the Fool is Lynne Cantwell’s latest book which is part of this month’s round on kindlescout. Today’s post is a last push to get the word out and also to share her thank you giveaway with all her readers and you.

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For those of you who are not aware of the kindlescout program, it is a reader-powered publishing platform for new, never-before-published books. We have the power here, because we the readers get to help decide if a book gets published. Selected books will
be published by Kindle Press.

Today I’m hosting Lynne to share an opportunity to not only help out, but get a chance to get a free book! As a way to thank EVERYONE for nominating, each book you nominate, not just this one, will be sent from kindlescout to your reader! Each book, as in can nominate up to three more books after Seasons of the Fool ;). The nominations close on the 26th so with Lady Reader’s Tours, I am helping this push to share this and get more nominations!

 There are a couple ways you can help and Lynne has an EPIC cool THANK YOU GIVEAWAY for a KindleHD6 in any color you want.

You can share the post :), you can click and share this pre-made link….

Tweet: Less than a week left to nominate SEASONS of the FOOL by @LynneCantwell for #KindleScout! #amreading http://ctt.ec/94cMy+
Click to Share!

…And you can nominate Seasons of the Fool on kindlescout!

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This is also the reveal of her new cover. Let’s get it nominated!

Seasons of the Fool

By: Lynne Cantwell
Published: kindlescout Oct. 26
fantasy, magic-realism, urban-fantasy, paranormal-romance

A Fool’s journey begins with a single step…

Julia Morton Michaud has fled Chicago for her grandparents’ summer home in Michiana. She believes the cottage near Lake Michigan will be a refuge – a quiet place for her to pursue a  writing career while her spirit heals from a string of failed relationships.

But her past keeps intruding. Her ex-husband, Lance, is under investigation for defrauding his wealthy investors, and the specter of having to testify at his trial hangs over her. She begins a new relationship with a man she hardly knows. And her neighbor and former lover, David Turner, is trapped in his own troubled marriage.

Julia discovers a labyrinth in the woods near her cottage. It belongs to Elsie and Thea, the elderly ladies who live at the end of the lane. Julia wants to use it for meditation, but she doesn’t know the risks. For the women have their own agenda, and it’s tied to the rug Elsie is endlessly weaving.

The truths Julia learns in the labyrinth have the potential to change all their lives – if only she will take them to heart.

– Goodreads | KindleScout –

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meet-the-author-orange

lynne-cantwellLynne Cantwell grew up on the shores of Lake Michigan.
She worked as a broadcast journalist for many years; she has written for CNN, the late lamented Mutual/NBC Radio News, and a bunch of radio and TV news outlets you have probably never heard of, including a defunct wire service called Zapnews.
Lynne’s vast overeducation includes a journalism degree from Indiana University, a masters degree in fiction writing from Johns Hopkins University, and a paralegal certificate. She is a contributing author at Indies Unlimited.
She currently lives near Washington, DC.
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Across Lake Shore Drive from the beach, behind the multi-million-dollar “cottages” atop the dunes – the ones with views all the way to Chicago – the woods begin.
Old-growth oak and maple tower over the faux log cabins that nestle into the understory – dogwood, sassafras, tulip poplar, and the occasional pine. Most of the houses look vacant. School begins earlier than it used to, and the families who spent their summer days frolicking in the waves and riding bikes along the winding lanes have gone back to their workaday lives on the other side of the lake. But here and there, windows are still open to catch the warm, early September air. The cars in the driveways of most of these homes sport Indiana or Michigan plates, but some belong to the summer people for whom summer hasn’t quite yet ended.
Here’s one on a corner just a block from Lake Michigan. There’s a gray station wagon with Illinois plates parked in the concrete driveway, and a pickup truck with local plates angled in behind it. A couple of guys in t-shirts and worn jeans are erecting a sign in the front yard – “Ames Construction Co.” – while a man with thinning ginger hair signs something on a clipboard.
We turn the corner onto Nokomis Trail and pass a few more cottages, interspersed with vacant lots where wild grapevines twist around neighboring saplings. In a manicured yard that would look at home in any suburb, an elderly man pushes a lawn mower. On the street in front of his house, a wooden mallard stands guard over his mailbox and two others, its whirligig wings spinning lazily in the breeze.
Every now and then, the man pauses to wipe his forehead with a carefully-folded red bandanna; as he pauses, he shakes his head over the cottage across the way, nearly invisible behind a riot of unkempt bushes and vines.
Next to this abandoned house is a vacant lot. Next to that, at the very end of Nokomis Trail, is a tiny cottage that looks like something out of a fairy story. Garden statuary – here a frog, there a nymph on a log – nestle amidst gangly purple mums. A gnome guards the entrance to the stepping-stone walk, and several wind chimes hang from the porch eaves.
The elderly man glances toward this cottage and crosses himself surreptitiously. Then he goes back to work.
****
Inside the cottage at the end of the lane, a plump, matronly woman with a cheerful face hums as she works a loom. The frame takes up most of the living room, leaving only space enough for the fieldstone fireplace, two easy chairs, and a tiny television.
The woman pauses in her work and whistles, long and low. “Well,” she says to herself. “Isn’t that interesting.”
Just then, the back door bangs shut. The woman at the loom looks toward the kitchen, where a tall, thin woman with a narrow face has just come in. Out of habit, she ducks under the herbs hanging from the rafters as she removes her gardening gloves.
“Mind your shoes, dear,” the plump woman says. “I just swept.”
“I’m going back out,” the tall one says as she gets herself a glass of water at the sink. As she waits for the glass to fill, she says, “I saw another dragonfly. That makes seven, just this morning.”
“Was this one headed up the street, too? Toward the Morton place?”
The tall woman nods, then downs half of the water in one long drink. “Looks like things are about to change around here.”
“Yes,” the plump woman says, examining her weaving. “I see that.” She turns back to the tall woman with a sunny smile. “At last!”
****
At the same moment, thirty-five miles across the lake as the crow flies, Julia Morton Michaud sits in her lawyer’s office. Elaine’s firm is small, so their offices in Chicago’s Loop don’t command the sweeping view of the city that a larger firm would have. But as the Haddon of O’Leary and Haddon LLP, Elaine rates an office with a glimpse of the lake.
Julia attempts to maintain a professional demeanor as Elaine goes through the checklist: life insurance, health insurance, retirement accounts. The country club membership. The burial plots. All of the knotted strands that will have to be untangled before her marriage can be dissolved.
All of the legal knots, anyway. The emotional bonds frayed away long since.
“Now, the checking accounts,” Elaine says.
“Equal split,” says Julia. “Same with the savings and money market accounts. And the stocks.” She expects a fight over the stocks, but intends to stand her ground. She needs those investments to live the life she means to live. And she refuses to let Lance get away with everything.
“And the real estate?” the lawyer goes on. “I assume he’s keeping the Gold Coast condo. But you’re going to keep the house in Evanston, right?”
“No,” Julia says. “He can have that, too.”
Elaine looks at her over the top of her reading glasses. “It’s worth several million dollars, isn’t it?” At Julia’s nod, the lawyer goes on, “Well, we have some options. We can ask him to buy you out. Or we can stipulate that the house be put on the market.”
“I don’t want the money,” Julia blurts. “I don’t want any part of that house. He can have it.”
Elaine gives her a look of barely-concealed disbelief. “As your attorney,” she says, “I would strongly advise that that would be against your best interests. But as your friend….” She shakes her head. “Julia, what are you thinking? You’re entitled to half the house, as well as half the condo. And most of your wealth is tied up in your real estate holdings, unless I miss my guess. What are you going to live on, if you give everything to him? For that matter, where are you going to live?”
Julia tilts her chin up. “The house in Michiana. I’m going to live there.”
“In that derelict cottage?” Elaine’s shock is plain.
“It’s not derelict,” Julia says, defensive. “It needs some work, that’s all. And it’s quiet. It’s the perfect place for me to get my head together and do some serious writing.”
The attorney shakes her head. “So you’re really going to lock yourself away in that moldy old place. I thought you were kidding when you mentioned it at dinner last week.”
“Nope.” Julia pulls her chin up higher. “I’ve been giving it a lot of thought. This is exactly what I want to do.”
The lawyer sighs. “Well, I’ll draw up the agreement with that in place and send you a draft by tomorrow morning at the latest. But I think you’re making a big mistake.”
Julia nods – in acknowledgement, not in agreement. She looks past Elaine’s shoulder and out the window, beyond the end of the concrete canyon, where a sliver of Lake Michigan is visible. The waves glitter in the harsh light of midday. It feels like a promise. Or like a release.
Silence draws her attention back to her friend. Elaine is regarding her with a wistful expression. “We’ll miss you,” she says.
Julia waves away the sentiment. “It’s not like I’m moving to the moon,” she says with a laugh. “I’ll only be sixty miles away.”
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Book Tour and #Giveaway Crosswind by Lynne Cantwell

TOUR-BANNER---CROSSWIND

Today I’m hosting the book that blasted across the web not too long ago. Once again I’m happy to showcase

CROSSWIND

BY

LYNNE CANTWELL

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Crosswinds-600-jpgCrosswind (Land, Sea, Ski: Book 1)

Life on Earth is much improved since the pagan gods’ return. As conflict eases around the world, attention — and money — has turned to more humanitarian goals: improving the lives of the First Nations peoples and others who were repressed for thousands of years.

But the former ruling class – the military, religious, and corporate leaders who profited under the old system — are about to stage a last-ditch effort to bring their good times back.

The gods refuse to start a new war against those men, because that would make them no better than Their opponents. Instead, They have drafted three humans to help Them. Together, Tess, Sue and Darrell must find a way past their own flaws to ensure the gods’ peace will not be destroyed.

Amazon ~ Smashwords ~ Goodreads

Crosswind
Genre – Urban Fantasy
Pages – approx 275 (68K words)
Published November 20th – Amazon 

***

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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Lynne Cantwell has been writing fiction since the second grade, when the kid who sat in front of her showed her a book he had written, and she thought, “I could do that.” The result was Susie and the Talking Doll, a picture book, illustrated by the author, about a girl who owned a doll that not only could talk, but could carry on conversations. The book had dialogue but no paragraph breaks. Today, after a twenty-year career in broadcast journalism and a master’s degree in fiction writing from Johns Hopkins University (or perhaps despite the master’s degree), Lynne is still writing fantasy. In addition, she is a contributing author at Indies Unlimited.

I had the chance to ask Lynne a few things to spice up this tour and give some inside information on the woman behind the author. So here’s the result of this little ‘get together’.

Hi Lynne,  welcome and thanks for taking the time to do this in this busy time. The one question I want to ask you Lynne is … *drumroll*

If you could only speak the truth for the rest of your life which persons would you avoid?

My employers. I wouldn’t want to blurt out the wrong thing on a day when I hadn’t had enough sleep. And I would pretty much have to stay off Facebook.

And I presented her with a little This or That

Fountain pen or ballpoint: Ballpoint. I dislike the sound of the nib scratching along the paper. And fountain pens always leave those tell-tale smudges on your fingers.

Blue or black: Hmm. I suppose very dark blue is not an option…? Blue is my favorite color, so I’ll have to go with that.

Paper or vellum/parchment: How old a woman do you take me for? 😀 Paper, please. Although vellum has its place in certain applications – fancy invitations, for instance. Which I never receive. Not that I’m bitter. Um, let’s move on…

Letter or email: Email, sadly. Letters are more fun to write and receive, but I’m hooked on immediacy.

Abbreviations or the words: Abbreviations, apparently. My editor commented on all the acronyms I put in the Crosswind. But this is D.C.! That’s how we talk here!

Show or tell: Show. Much more effective. Even when writing backstory, showing (i.e., including the character’s feelings at the time, or having him/her relive them) is much better than just a straight narrative.

Adverb or show: Again, show. Although I’m less against the use of adverbs in fiction than I was when I was writing radio news copy, where both adjectives and adverbs were pretty much verboten.

Dialogue or narrative: Dialogue, as long as it sounds like an actual conversation. If you find yourself writing, “As you know, Stan…” then you’re not writing an actual conversation. Because as you know, Stan, nobody actually talks that way.

Series or stand-alone: Hmm. Either/or. I do like series, or I wouldn’t write them. But sometimes a single book is just perfect. (And it’s a mistake to split a single book into two or even three bloated movies, not that I have any particular movie trilogies in mind here.)

Novel or short stories: Novel, for sure. When I’m reading, I like to immerse myself in the world for a long period of time.

If you want to know more about Lynne, she’s been a featured author on here. Read the full interview here and discover what she told me about …, or you can find out more about her on:

TWITTER @LynneCntwell | FACEBOOK | BLOG | GOODREADS | AMAZON 

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Do not forget to enter the Rafflecopter giveaway!

You could win:

a DREAM PILLOW from the American Indian Museum store + A signed paperback, another signed paperback and a $10 Amazon GC

Featured Author – Lynne Cantwell

???????????????????????????????Hi Lynne,

Thanks for taking the time to come over and answer a few of my questions. The readers have briefly met you on my blog not too long ago, but this is their chance to really get to know you. In order to allow that to happen, I’d like to start with a few ‘personal’ questions, if that’s okay?

I know you are originally a journalist, but do you ever long to get back to writing news stories, or are you perfectly happy writing fiction?

Occasionally, if there’s a big story happening, I wish I was back in news. It’s quite an adrenalin rush to be right there in the middle of things – to know about it before anybody else does, and then to be the one to tell people about it. But I don’t miss the daily grind. Or the noisy police scanners. Or the phone calls from listeners when it snows, wanting to know if their school is closed. Hmm, I guess I’m happier writing fiction.

What was the best non-fiction piece you’ve ever written?

I don’t know if it’s the best piece I ever wrote – but while I was working for a radio station in Norfolk, Virginia, I wrote a story for our Sunday magazine-style show about how the local housing authority had financed a bunch of repairs to a woman’s house. Virginia Beach is fairly upscale, but the city still has pockets of poverty (or it did, back in the ‘80s when I lived there), and this woman was just so grateful to have a kitchen with appliances that worked.  I won an award from the Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association for the story.

What made you decide to get your fiction published?

One of the long-standing items on my bucket list was to write a novel and get it published. When Joy Calderwood, who I knew from a message board, started up an e-book publishing house, she offered to publish some of my work, but I didn’t have anything in the hopper right then. She came back to me later and offered to publish a couple of short stories that I’d written for an anthology project that we’d both been involved with. At that point, I said yes. Then I actually made a couple of bucks from them, which is more than I could say for the nonfiction book I’d co-authored. So when I finished The Maidens’ War, I sent it to Joy and she agreed to publish it. And the rest is history….

Given the choice where would you rather live? Mountains, or seaside?

Mountains, without a doubt. I grew up within walking distance of Lake Michigan, so big bodies of water have their appeal for me. But Colorado has always felt like my spiritual home. I fully intend to move back there one of these days.

Do you enjoy the great outdoors, or do you rather recline on a sunbed to read a book?

I was much more of an outdoorsy person when I was younger. These days, I prefer to stay inside to read or knit – or write!

There, that wasn’t too bad, was it? But it’s not why you are here. You want to tell the world about your work, right? So, what is the title of the book you would like to talk about, and can you give us a small taster of it?

The book is called Crosswind: Land, Sea, Sky Book 1.

Crosswinds-600-jpgIt’s an urban fantasy, and the first in a trilogy that’s set ten years after my 5-book series, The Pipe Woman Chronicles. Here’s an excerpt from the first chapter. The main characters meet for the first time when Darrell answers Sue and Tess’s Craigslist ad for a new roommate. Tess is working overnights in TV and has just gotten home:

Read the excerpt below to get a feel of how this plays out.

“Let me show you around,” Sue said to Darrell. “Tess, you don’t need to come along.”
Tess levered herself out of the chair. “No, I’d better. Otherwise I’ll be asleep in a minute.” She trailed them up the stairs.
Sue was motioning through the door of Ginger’s former room like the eye candy on a game show. “This would be your room,” she said. “It’s small, but it might suit you better than it would suit one of us – guys usually have less stuff, don’t they?” She was smiling hopefully at Darrell as he ducked his head through the doorway. Tess hung back near the door to her own room.
“Did you say you have a basement?” he asked as he stepped back out.
“I did,” Sue said.
“I’d like to take a look at it.”
They all trooped through the townhouse and down the basement stairs. Tess stopped about halfway down and sank to a seat, leaning against the cinder block wall, while Darrell prowled around the gloomy space, dodging boxes, castoff furniture, and their makeshift closet for winter clothing.
Finally, he said, “I can make this work.”
Tess blinked and sat up straight. Sue said, “Wait a minute. You want to sleep down here?”
“Sure.”
“But it’s gross,” she said. “It’s damp, and there are spider crickets and Goddess knows what else. And the windows leak when we get a lot of rain.”
Darrell had cracked a tiny smile – the first one Tess had seen on his face, she realized. “‘Goddess’?” he asked.
“Yes. I’m Wiccan. Is that a problem?” Sue said mildly, but Tess heard the edge.
“Not at all,” Darrell responded. “Would it be okay if I moved all of your stuff to the bottom of the stairs? Then I could put up a partition with a regular door in it. I’d make sure to leave common access to the hot water heater and electrical box in the back.”
“You’d have a huge space,” Tess said, thinking aloud. “Like a studio apartment, except you wouldn’t have a kitchen or a bathroom.”
“Exactly,” Darrell said. “I can shower at the gym at work, no problem. So all we would really be sharing is the kitchen and the half bath.”
Sue and Tess looked at each other. “Sounds like a great deal for all of us,” Sue said. “Welcome home, roomie.” She and Darrell shook hands, and they trooped back up to the kitchen.
There, Tess held out her hand to Darrell. As he took it, she had another of those weird visions. This time, it was a giant rabbit’s head superimposed over Darrell’s. It grinned and winked at her, just as Senator Holt’s apparition had. Tess blinked rapidly.
“Are you okay?” the rabbit asked.
“No,” Tess said. “No, I am definitely not okay. It’s been great to meet you and I’m glad this is going to work out for all of us. But I am so tired that I’m starting to hallucinate. If you’ll both excuse me, I’m going to bed.”
She could have sworn she heard the rabbit chuckling as she headed up the stairs. But what chilled her was the crow that cawed right along with him.

Want to read more? Why not hop on over to Amazon and get your copy?

Did you have difficulty coming up with the title?

It was sort of a chain reaction, actually. I knew the Morrigan would be one of the deities in this series, and since the Celts’ three sacred realms are Land, Sea, and Sky, that seemed like the perfect framework. Once I determined I would write a trilogy – one book for each realm, if you will – then the titles were easy. Crosswind is the Sky book. The next book, Undertow, is the Sea book. The final book will be Scorched Earth.

This was a far different experience than I had with naming the Pipe Woman Chronicles books. The title of the first book, Seized, was relatively easy, but I spent a lot of quality time with a thesaurus to come up with the rest!

If you would have to change the genre in order to be able to publish it, what would it be then? i.e. would you conform your work to suit the market?

This is a very interesting question. Not long ago, someone suggested to me that I could sell a lot more copies of The Pipe Woman Chronicles if I toned down the criticism of Christianity. But for me, part of the joy of being an indie author is that I can tell my story my way, without regard to whether it will sell a billion copies. I’ve known all along that The Pipe Woman Chronicles – and now Land, Sea, Sky – aren’t going to be for everybody, but I do think there’s a market out there. And I think almost every Christian has questioned his or her beliefs at one time or another.

Can you tell me how you celebrate finally getting that tricky chapter (or para) right?

Usually by wiping my brow and plunging onward. Well – I might get another Diet Coke with Lime. 😉

Is there anything you don’t like about being an author?

Marketing is not my favorite thing to do. I had a real problem with it at first. What finally worked was to think of Lynne Cantwell as a brand, and my books as products under that brand. Only then could I stand to look at my author picture without cringing. 😀

What do you do marketing wise and what do you think generates the most attention to your books?

I’ve participated in several blog tours, which are great for getting your name out there. I’ve also paid for some ads. Free days on Amazon used to yield good results, but the post-free bounce is gone now – and the Countdown feature is probably too new to get a read on (I’ll be doing one for the Pipe Woman Chronicles Omnibus later this month – we’ll see how it goes). The best result I’ve had so far, in terms of sales, was the book blast the Finishing Fairies arranged for the release of Annealed. Kriss and Kai rock the house, in my humble opinion.

Is there any food or beverage that is a constant factor in either your books or life?

Now that you mention it, there seems to be a lot of coffee drinking in Crosswind. The three main characters share a townhouse, so they congregate in the kitchen a lot. I don’t drink as much coffee as they do, but I drank a lot more of it when I kept Tess’s crazy work hours.

What is your favourite dish and can you give me the recipe?

I’m not much of a cook, but I do like to bake – and it’s nearly Christmas, which means Christmas cookies! My Czech-American mother used to make almond crescents, among others,  at Christmastime, but I never tried making them myself until a few years ago. Here’s the recipe I use:

cookies

2 sticks of butter

1/2 cup sugar

1 egg yolk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 cup ground blanched almonds

Between 1 3/4 and 2 cups of all-purpose flour

Confectioners’ sugar

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy; beat in egg yolk and vanilla, mixing well. Add almonds and flour, thoroughly incorporating.

Break off walnut-sized pieces of dough, shape each into a crescent and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake 15-20 min., or until slightly brown on the edges.

Roll in confectioners’ sugar while still hot. When cool, roll them again. Store tightly covered. Makes about 3 dozen.

They sound and look delicious!

Next stage, would you be able to come up with a credible excuse why you haven’t written a whole day? Remember, I have to believe it!

Well, take today, for example. I have a perfectly good excuse for not writing today. I’m writing this on the day after the last day of NaNoWriMo. I had to clean out the cat box, put away the laundry, and attend to all the other chores I didn’t get done over the past four weeks. So I didn’t get any writing done (other than answering these questions – does that count?).

Okay now that we have the mandatory questions out of the way, shoot your mouth off. Tell me whatever you want the blab about. But please no cats, dogs, or children. Make me laugh, or cry, or even envious. Tell me something none has ever heard before from you. hehehe, love those little dirty secrets, real or make believe. 🙂

Dirty little secrets, huh? But no cats. So I can’t tell you about the state of the cat box….

But seriously, folks, I’m pretty sure I haven’t told this story before: When I was about three years old, I nearly drowned. My mother and I had gone to the beach with some relatives while we were visiting them in Maine, and at one point I decided to follow my teenaged cousin out into the ocean. I must have gotten swamped by a wave, but I don’t remember it. What I do recall is seeing my cousin way ahead of me and trying to catch up to her, and then waking up on my back on the beach. No idea who rescued me. But in any case, I survived – for good or ill.

* * * * *

Crosswinds-600-jpg

AMAZON | KOBO | iTUNESSMASHWORDS

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Storm’s coming…

Life on Earth is much improved since the pagan gods’ return. As conflict eases around the world, attention — and money — has turned to more humanitarian goals: improving the lives of the First Nations peoples and others who were repressed for thousands of years.

But the former ruling class – the military, religious, and corporate leaders who profited under the old system — are about to stage a last-ditch effort to bring their good times back.

The gods refuse to start a new war against those men, because that would make them no better than Their opponents. Instead, They have drafted three humans to help Them. Together, Tess, Sue and Darrell must find a way past their own flaws to ensure the gods’ peace will not be destroyed.

Thank you for stopping by Lynne and sharing all of the personal tid bits as well as your book with us. All that’s left for me is to tell the readers they can follow you online at:

AmazonCalderwood BooksGoodreadsFacebookTwitter, and her blog

Crosswind by Lynne Cantwell #IU

bookblast-graphic

book-symbolStorm ís coming!

Life on Earth is much improved since the pagan gods’ return. As conflict eases around the world, attention — and money — has turned to more humanitarian goals: improving the lives of the First Nations peoples and others who were repressed for thousands of years.

But the former ruling class – the military, religious, and corporate leaders who profited under the old system — are about to stage a last-ditch effort to bring their good times back.

The gods refuse to start a new war against those men, because that would make them no better than Their opponents. Instead, They have drafted three humans to help Them. Together, Tess, Sue and Darrell must find a way past their own flaws to ensure the gods’ peace will not be destroyed.

Amazon ~ Smashwordsadd to goodreads

Crosswind
Genre – Urban Fantasy
Pages – approx 275 (68K words)
Published November 20th – Amazon 

Also anyone who wants an eARC for a Read for Review copy, please sign-up HERE

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About the Author: Lynne Cantwell

Lynne CantwellLynne Cantwell has been writing fiction since the second grade, when the kid who sat in front of her showed her a book he had written, and she thought, “I could do that.” The result was†Susie and the Talking Doll, a picture book, illustrated by the author, about a girl who owned a doll that not only could talk, but could carry on conversations. The book had dialogue but no paragraph breaks. Today, after a twenty-year career in broadcast journalism and a master’s degree in fiction writing from Johns Hopkins University (or perhaps despite the master’s degree), Lynne is still writing fantasy. In addition, she is a contributing author at Indies Unlimited.

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | BLOG | GOODREADS | AMAZON

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